Brief details of those commemorated on the Anstruther and Cellardyke war memorials

Anstruther Easter


Mitchell Anderson, Engineer RNR(T) (34) Killed at sea, off Queenstown Ireland when his ship HMS Morococala hit a mine 19 November 1917. Married to Euphemia.  2 Fowler Street Cellardyke.(Also on Cellardyke memorial)

Frederick Drury Blunsdon, Petty officer, RN (31) Killed when his submarine D5 struck a mine in the North Sea 3 November 1914. Married to Rose and lived at 164 St Augustine Rd Southsea Portsmouth.(Photo gallery)

Alex Boyter, Private Highland Light Infantry, 1 Battalion. (34) Killed when his troopship Cameronia was torpedoed and sunk by submarine 150 miles east of malta 15 April 1917. Worked in his fathers firm Boyter & Sons in Crail Road. Lived with wife Lucy at I Melville Terrace / 2 Rustic Place.

Robert H Carmichael, Signaller Highland Light Infantry - the only RH Carmichael on record was not in the HLI but was a 24 year old private in the 9th Btn of the Cameronians ( Scottish Rifles) and died on 12 May 1918. His parents lived in 24 Burns Avenue, Buckhaven, Fife.

George Moncrieff Cunningham, Private, Black Watch. ( 28) Killed on the Somme, shot whilst dressing the wounds of a Pittenweem soldier, 30 August 1917. Ships chandler in fathers firm. (Brother Alex Cunningham, RAMC was awarded Military Medal)  ‘Glenogle’, Crail Road, Anstruther.

George Darsie, Lieutenant,Fife and Forfar Yeomanry (35)
Ex regular soldier who had served in South Africa.
Emigrated to Canada. Died of wounds 31 July 1918.
Son of George Darsie and Titaua Marama, a Tahitian
princess, of Johnston Lodge, Hadfoot Wynd, Anstruther.
 

William Dunnett, Engineer, RNTS (25) Killed only a fortnight after joining his ship S.S. "Benlawers" (Mercantile Marine) when it hit a mine in Irish Channel 12 May 1918 . Joined Merchant Navy prior to war. 6 Union Place Anstruther.

James Elder, Lieutenant, Black Watch (23) Reported missing, presumed dead 21 March 1918. 6 High Street, Anstruther.

James Parker Gilmour, Private, Black Watch 1 Btn, (21)  A regular soldier, born in Anstruther, he was killed in action at the Battle of the Aisne 16 September 1914. This makes him the first local man killed in World War 1, yet this was never acknowledged at the time or subsequently. He lived with his parents James and Mary Gilmour, High Terrace, Anstruther

Francis P. Grubb, Private , Black Watch (36). Died 2 September 1916. Married to Christina Leitch Grubb, 23 Castle Street, Dumbarton.

R.C. Harrow, Private, Royal Army Service Corps, 61st Motor Transport Company. (46). Severely wounded in Arras offensive, 3 May 1917 and died 27 May 1917. Buried in Anstruther Easter Churchyard. Prior to enlisting in February 1915 was an Edinburgh Infirmary ambulance wagon driver. Brother lived at 3 Rustic Place, Anstruther.

James Henry Webster Long Hay, Captain, Seaforth Highlanders (41). Left Anstruther at age 16 after working in local solicitors office to join army. 21 years in uniform seeing service in India, Egypt and Boer war. Retired and worked for Jacob's Biscuits - re-enlisted on outbreak of war. Died 30 November 1915. Lived with wife at 21 Birchdale Road, Waterloo, Liverpool. (Photo gallery)


  Elizabeth Johnston, Telephonist, Queen Mary’s Army Auxiliary Corps (27). Died on Christmas Day 1918 after falling from the tower of St. Ouen Church, Rouen. Book was written about her “ Johnnie of QMAAC.” Brought up in the building which is now the Cellar Restaurant. (Photo gallery)




Preston Hugh Keay, Private, Canadian Engineers (21). Killed by a bullet wound through the lungs while in charge of a working party, about 8.45pm on Thursday March 16. Was apprenticed as a plumber before going to Canada with his brother. 3 brothers in the Forces. Parents home- Burnside Place, Cellardyke. ( Also on Cellardyke memorial.) (Photo gallery)


H.R. Lindsay, Captain, Loyal Northern Lancashire Regiment (27). A native of Bolton, he came to Anstruther as teacher of English at Waid Academy. Awarded Military Cross in January 1916. Died at the Somme, 8 August 1916.

James Johnstone Moir Lindsay, Private, Gordon Highlanders 8/10 Btn. (25) was working at Beardmore’s Works, Clydebank before joining up. Killed  in Arras offensive 10 April 1917. Hadfoot Wynd, Anstruther.

Angus McKay, Private, Black Watch. (22) Killed in action 13 November 1916, mother notified in letter written by Col TD Murray of Anstruther. Had been home suffering from “trench fever” in September 1916. Lived in Kilrenny. (Also on Cellardyke memorial)

Cecil Myles Parker, Private, Black Watch 4/5 Btn (20). Previously a compositor on the East of Fife Observer. Wounded in November 1917, killed in action 3 May 1918. Union Place, Anstruther.(Also on Cellardyke memorial)

Thomas Robertson, Private, Black Watch 1/7 Btn. (32) A native of Anstruther his parents had gone to live in Leven. Died 17 June 1916.

James Smith, Sergeant, Black Watch. Had been posted missing but was known to be a prisoner of war being held at Lemberg in June 1916. Although said to be unwounded he died on 26 August 1918. Shore Street, Anstruther.

Thomas Swan, Lance Corporal, Black Watch 2nd Btn.(26) Had already served for 9 years as a regular soldier in India. Won DCM for his part in a counter attack, Nov.1914 . Killed in action 5 December 1914. ( Brother of William Swan) Chalmers House, Anstruther. (Photo gallery)

William Swan, Private, Labour Corps (26) Died of acute pneumonia, 29 October 1918. Buried in Anstruther Easter Churchyard. ( Brother of Thomas Swan). Chalmers House, Anstruther.

John Thomson, Master Mariner RNTS (47). Prior to the war was engaged by Caledonian Ship Company, Liverpool. He was captain of liner in Admiralty service, when he drowned in an accident off Portland, Dorset, 20 March 1917. Buried Anstruther Easter Churchyard. Home was at “Rathmore”  Crail Road. (Also on Cellardyke memorial)

 William B Watson, Lance Corporal (24),    Black Watch 1/7 Btn. Employed in his father’s oilskin manufacturing business in Cellardyke. He was the first of the Anstruther Territorials to be killed in action, caught in no mans land digging a trench 24 May 1915. Lived with his parents at “Craigholm”, Ladywalk, Anstruther.(Also on Cellardyke memorial) (Photo gallery) 







John Wilson, Private, Black Watch but latterly Driver, Royal Army Service Corps (32)  - died 31 October 1918.  
 
Anstruther Wester Memorial


James Anderson, Private, 54th Canadians ( Central Ontario Regiment) (36) A mason to trade he had lived in Anstruther Wester prior to emigrating to Canada, around 1910, with his wife Maggie herself a native of Cellardyke. Killed in action 10 February 1917. ( Sister in law Mrs Watson lived at James Street, Cellardyke)

Robert Archibald, Private, Royal Scots 16 Btn (36)  Along with his brother was killed on the first day of the Somme, 1 July 1916. His father Robert Bruce Archibald went to live in Tobago after making his fortune from textiles manufacture in Scotland. After working in Canada and Australia had come to England. Pre - war lived with his wife in Isabel, at 1 Trafalgar Road Twickenham (although she was staying in Edinburgh with her father the well known Scottish artist Hugh Cameron RSA, at the time of Roberts death.). His sister lived with their aunt Miss Gordon, Bankwell Road, Anstruther .

W. M. Archibald, Lance Corporal, Royal Scots 16 Btn. Killed on first day of Somme 1 July 1916 Brother of Robert (see above). Both brothers had at one time been fruitfarmers in British Columbia.  

A.A. Brodie, Lance Corporal, Black Watch 9 Btn (27) Youngest son of prominent local councillor and businessman, Baillie Brodie. A golf cleek maker in his father’s firm he had sought exemption from military service after conscription was introduced. Killed in action in the Third Battle of Ypres 31 July 1917.

John Cargill, Captain, Black Watch 7 Btn. A Church of Scotland clergyman he was assistant minister at Scoonie Church. A local man, he had been a pupil at Waid Academy and a graduate of St Andrews University. Joined up as a private. Died of wounds suffered in the Battle of Arras, 24 April 1917.

Hugh M. Dickson, Signaller, Black Watch 8 Btn.  (24)  Although learned his trade as a joiner he had been employed on a fishing drifter at the outbreak of the war. Killed in Battle of Arras, 3 May 1915. ( Brother of William, killed 30.3.1918) High Street, Anstruther Wester.

William M. Dickson, Private, Black Watch 9 Btn (19) mother was informed that he had been wounded and was missing. Clung to hope that he had been taken prisoner but is recorded killed on 30 March 1918.( Brother of Hugh, killed 3.5.1918) High Street, Anstruther Wester.

 Alex Doig, Private, Black Watch 4/5 Btn. Previously a coachman at Grangemuir, an estate outside Pittenweem. Joined up June 1917. Killed by shrapnel from a shell burst whilst talking to his brother in law 9 February 1918. His wife lived at her family home at 3 Castle Street Anstruther Wester, with their two young children. (Photo gallery)

Thomas Drummond, Private, Scots Guards 2 Btn. A locomotive fireman, he was lost in strange circumstances. He was known to be wounded on the Somme and making his way to a dressing station, but never made it and was presumed dead 15 September 1916. Subsequently his papers and photos were found on the body of a dead German. He had been recommended for a DCM prior to his death.

James Hepburn, Private, 1st London Scottish (28) Served his time in the Gas Office in Anstruther before moving to take up job in London. Killed in action 30 November 1917. High Street Anstruther Wester.

William Hogg, Private, Black Watch 8 Btn (24) Another gardener from the Grangemuir estate (born in Markinch), he was reported missing  25 September 1915 after 3 days of fierce fighting.

Adam Lindsay, Lieutenant, Royal Scots 10 Btn. (33) a native of St Monans he was employed with the Clydesdale Bank. His wife Jeannie gave birth to their daughter  on 8 April 1918; and he travelled to France the following month. He was killed on 1 August 1918. “Clifton “ Pittenweem Road, Anstruther.

John Louden, Private, Black Watch 8 Btn (22). A gardener to trade  he was killed in the Battle of Loos 25 September 1915, the local paper reporting gorily that his body was “caught on the barbed wire riddled with bullets”. Rennyhill Cottage. (Photo gallery)

Robert Drummond Parker, Private, Black Watch 8 Btn. (20)  Previously a vanman he died of his wounds 19 October 1916. (Brother of William) Shore Road, Anstruther.

William Parker, Private, London Postal Rifles (20) Had worked in Anstruther post office before moving to London. He was reported to have died of “cerbro spinal meningitis” 27 June 1915 and is buried in the City of London cemetery.( Brother of Robert) Shore Road Anstruther.

Thomas Paterson, Sergeant, King’s Own Scottish Borderers (23) Another who worked on the Grangemuir estate at Pittenweem as a chauffeur to Colonel and Mrs Erskine. His family were from Kirkcaldy. Died of wounds 21 September 1917.

William Fortune Pringle, Private, Black Watch 8 Btn (22) Worked in his fathers firm, Gray and Pringle’s the ironmonger from which many former apprentices and tradesmen went to war. Killed instantaneously when he was hit in the head after his battalion had taken 3 lines of German trenches during the Battle of Loos on 27 September 1915. Daisy Bank, Anstruther

George Robertson, Stoker, RN  (25) Regular in Royal Navy was killed when his ship HMS Monmouth was sunk by the Scharnhorst at the Battle of Coronel off the coast of Chile, 1 November 1914. Volum Cottage Anstruther.

Alex Robb, Private, Black Watch 7 Btn. (19) A railwayman, he was killed along with William Watson on the first occasion that the local territorials reached the frontline, 24 May 1915. School Wynd Anstruther.

William Tosh, Lance Corporal, Australian Light Horse (28) He had grown up on the  farm on which his late father had tenancy at Thirdpart between Anstruther and Crail. Emigrated to take up sheep farming in Australia. Killed in Gallipoli 7 August 1915. “Mansefield” Anstruther.

 David Watt, Private. Black Watch 8 Btn (22) A former cooper he had survived being wounded at Loos but died of wounds suffered at battle of the Somme, 18 July 1916. A brother Tom in the Royal Naval Air service was severely wounded at Dunkirk and another, James was also killed. (see below)

James W. Watt, Sergeant, Black Watch (31) Originally a cooper in Anstruther he was transferred to the Queens Royal West Surrey Regiment after the outbreak of the war where he was a musketry instructor. Belatedly despatched to the front and was in France only 6 weeks when he was shot by a sniper 25 October 1918. His wife Thomasina lived at their home 3 Bankwell Road Anstruther.

John Cunning Weir, Warrant Officer , Coastguard Service (45) Died at City Hospital Edinburgh 14 March 1918.  24 Shore Street Anstruther. Buried Anstruther Easter churchyard.

John C. Wood, Sergeant, Seaforth Highlanders. Had also been a chauffeur at Grangemuir estate. He was wounded early in the war in the battle of the Aisne in which his brother, a sergeant major in the Cameronians, had died. Subsequently fought at Mons and the Marne before being killed 25 June 1916.
 

Cellardyke Memorial

 Navy

Mitchell Anderson, Engineer RNR(T) (34) Killed at sea, off Queenstown Ireland when his ship HMS Morococala hit a mine 19 November 1917. The boat, which had been minesweeping, sank within 6 seconds  and all 13 crew were drowned. Married to Euphemia.  2 Fowler Street Cellardyke.

John Bett, Deckhand, RNRT (22) On patrol off the coast of Antrim on the R.N.R steam drifter Coreopsis, he was on a small boat trying to retrieve an anchor when it capsized and he was drowned, 20 April 1915. Buried at Kilrenny Parish Churchyard. 11 Shore Street, Cellardyke.

George Brown, Deckhand, RNRT . Served on H.M. Armed Fishing Smack Ivanhoe. Died 9 January 1919.

Alexander Brown, Deckhand, RNRT (28) died when his minesweeper, HMMS Blackmorevale was sunk by a mine off Montrose, on 1 May 1918. He had been with the ship for only 3 weeks, and was lost exactly 3 years to the day that he had joined up. 13 Dove Street Cellardyke.

Alexander Corstorphine, Deckhand, RNRT (19). Served his apprenticeship as a blacksmith and employed at the cleekmaking factory. Came from a fishing family (his father was the skipper/owner of the Steam Drifter Unity). He died after his boat HMT Gambri, was sunk by a mine off the Royal Sovereign Light Vessel, 18 January 1918. Buried in Kilrenny Parish Churchyard. “St. Abbs” West Forth Street, Cellardyke.

James Muir Gourlay, Deckhand, RNRT (23). On active service on HMS Western Queen in North Sea when he contracted influenza which became pneumonia. His family had received a letter saying that he had been very ill but he had got over the worst of it; followed by  a telegram the next day that he was dangerously ill. He died with his parents by his side in Ingham Hospital, 15 July 1918. Interred in Kilrenny with naval honours attended by his 4 brothers all in naval service. 6 Dove Street, Cellardyke.

Andrew Henderson (Jnr), Skipper RNRT (53) Was not on active service but was fishing off St Abbs Head in his motor yawl  Jane when his crew pulled in the nets which contained a mine on 14 August 1917. The explosion also cost the lives of his two sons Alexander(29) and Andrew (27), as well as two other crew members James Wilson and Thomas Boyter. None of them are commemorated on the memorial. 38 West Forth Street Cellardyke.

Alexander C. Keay, Mate, RNRT (25) Another young fisherman to lose his life whilst minesweeping, when HM Trawler Repro was sunk off Tod head. 26 April 1917. 29 Rodger Street, Cellardyke.

William Tarvit, Trimmer, RNRT (22) Died  from consumption on 13 October 1918.  He was  a cleek finisher in a local factory, and may have been previously discharged with shock from service aboard the Gunner Pelagos . He died at the family home at 2 Harbourhead, with his fisherman father James, (who was also on active service on the Motorlaunch Granton) at his bedside.

Robert Thomson, Leading Seaman, RNR (35) Served on HMS Armadale Castle, and survived the war only to fall victim to the flu epidemic which swept the nation, and military forces, dying at Plymouth Naval Hospital,  17 October 1918. George Street.  

Robert Wallace, Mate/ Second-hand RNRT (35) served on HM Trawler  " Fisher Boy";  died 3 October 1917 and is buried in East Mudros Cemetry Greece.

Alexander Watson, Skipper, RNRT (50) Attached to HMS Vivid, died 30 May 1919. Buried in Kilrenny Parish Churchyard. 50 John Street, Cellardyke.

David Wilson, Deckhand, RNRT (32) His boat, HM Trawler Waltham, was sunk by a submarine off the Isle of Man on 10 October 1917, with the loss of 13 crew. (Brother of George Wilson who fought with Canadian infantry - also on memorial )  28 Shore Street Cellardyke.

John Christie, 2nd Engineer, RNR (25) having served on the cruiser HMS Monitor, he was transferred to the trawler section and lost his life when HMPMS Queen of the North hit a mine off Orfordness 20 July 1917. The Queen of the North was a 22 year old paddle steamer which prior to the war ran day trips from Blackpool to Douglas on the Isle of Man. 29 men were lost in total when it sank. 4 George Street, Cellardyke.

James Dick, Seaman, RNR (21) yet another lost to a mine when HM Trawler Evadne sunk off Owers Light Vessel 27 February 1917. (Brother of Andrew Dick - also on memorial) 14 East Forth Street.

Robert Gardner, Seaman, RNR (22) was said to be the one of the first from Cellardyke to go on naval duty, serving firstly on a transport vessel and then as a gunner on S.S Greynog which was sunk when torpedoed without warning by a submarine on 18 April 1918. 2 Rodger Street, Cellardyke.

James Anstruther Moncrieff, Stoker, RNR (22)  A fisherman he had been an engineer on the local trawler Vanguard III. He served on HMS Invincible in the battle of the Falklands when the British ships sunk the Scharnhorst. Was lost when the Invincible was sunk at the battle of Jutland, 31 April 1916. “St. Helens”, West Forth Street, Cellardyke.

William Reekie, Seaman, RNR (22) Lost when HMS Clan Macnaughton foundered in the North Atlantic  3 February 1915. His ship was an armed merchant cruiser and was not thought to have been sunk by enemy action but lost either to the heavy weather or because of structural problems caused by the addition of armaments and plating.

Robert Thomson, Leading Seaman, RNR (35) Had been home on leave for a month from his ship HMS Armadale Castle for the first time in 16 months in April 1918, but subsequently died 17 October 1918. Buried at Kilrenny Parish Churchyard. George Street.

William Watson, Stoker, RNR.  Although in the Royal Navy he fought as a soldier with the Royal Naval Division Hood Battalion and was killed at Gallipoli, 4 June 1915.

John Morris Wood, Seaman, RNR (23). Served as a gunner on S.S. Wellaston. Died 8 January 1919. Buried Kilrenny Parish Churchyard. 26 Fowler Street, Cellardyke.

John Thomson, Master Mariner RNTS (47). Prior to the war was engaged by Caledonian Ship Company, Liverpool. He was captain of a liner in Admiralty service, when he drowned in an accident off Portland, Dorset, 20 March 1917. Buried Anstruther Easter Churchyard. ( Also on Anstruther memorial.) Home was at “Rathmore”  Crail Road.

 Army

David Bell, Private, Black Watch (41)  An army regular he had 20 years of service behind him including having fought in the Boer War. Was wounded at La Chappele on the Western Front before being killed in Mesopotamia. Left behind 5 children aged between 12 and 2. “ Frithfield” Anstruther. ( Killed in action 22 April 1916 with 2 Btn and is buried in Amara War Cemetery, Iraq) 

Alexander Bissett, Private, Black Watch  1/6 Btn. (21)  A baker, he was killed by a shot to the head,  22 July 1918. His father a cabinet maker with Gray and Pringle was sent  postcards recovered from his son’s body, looking forward to the end of the war.

Alexander Boyter (Brown) Private, Black Watch 7 Btn (25). Served apprenticeship as a plumber with Gray and Pringle although he had been a stoker on a drifter immediately prior to the war. Was killed by a shell burst on 31 May 1916. His late father ( not on memorial), was a fisherman who had been killed by a German mine in the North Sea. 1 Rodger Street.

Alexander Smith Boyter ( Smith) Black Watch 6 Btn (24). In civil life was a spinner at Messr Watson and Cos Roperie. Seriously wounded in eye in the early engagements of the war, and sent home to recover. Back at the front he was badly burned; and then survived a trench collapse when sandbags fell on him, as a result of which one of his comrades was instantly killed and another had his back broken.  Killed by shrapnel coming through window of building in which he was sheltering, 16 September 1917. 5 George Street, Cellardyke.

Alexander Boyter ( Bowman) Private Black Watch 8 Btn. (22)  A plasterer to trade he was killed in a bombing raid on German trenches 19 October 1916. 14 Rodger Street Cellardyke.

George Corstorphine, Private, Black Watch 8 Btn (25) A ploughman before joining up he had recovered after being wounded at Loos. Shrapnel wounds to his neck saw him brought to England for treatment but he died at Orpington hospital 10 August 1917. Buried in Kilrenny Parish Churchyard. 28 West Forth Street, Cellardyke.

George Moncrieff Cunningham, Private, Black Watch. ( 28) Killed on the Somme, shot whilst dressing the wounds of a Pittenweem soldier, 30 August 1917. Ships chandler in fathers firm. (Brother Alex Cunningham, RAMC was awarded Military Medal)  ‘Glenogle’, Crail Road, Anstruther. 

Andrew Dick, Private, Black Watch 6 Btn (19) Joined up under age when the war began and on active service for 3 years.  Twice wounded and gassed once  which saw him brought to Elie Hospital to convalesce. Killed 6 weeks after returning to France, 10 April 1918. ( Brother of James, also on memorial.) 14 East Forth Street.

John Doig, Private, Black Watch 7 Btn. (20) was training with the rest of the East Neuk territorials at camp in Kinghorn when suffered “an unexpected weakness.” Died at his father’s home 10 Dove Street on  20 November 1915. Buried in Kilrenny Parish churchyard.

Angus McKay, Private, Black Watch. (22) Killed in action 13 November 1916, Mother notified in letter written by Col TD Murray of Anstruther. Had been home suffering from “trench fever” in September 1916. Lived in Kilrenny. ( also on Anstruther Easter memorial)

Cecil Myles Parker, Private, Black Watch 4/5 Btn (20). Previously a compositor on the East of Fife Observer. Wounded in November 1917, killed in action 3 May 1918. Union Place, Anstruther. ( also on Anstruther Easter memorial)

Robert Shirreff, Private, Black Watch 8 Btn. (20) Another of the golf cleekmakers, he was a machine gunner when he was posted wounded and missing in action. No further news was heard of him and was presumed killed 19 October 1916. 59 George Street, Cellardyke.

James Tarvit, Private,  Black watch 1/7 Btn (27) - was transferred to Railway Operating  Division of Royal Engineers. Gassed  at the front, he died in hospital at Folkestone 20 June 1917. 

William B Watson, Lance Corporal, Black Watch 1/7 Btn. Employed in his father’s oilskin manufacturing business in Cellardyke. He was the first of the Anstruther Territorials to be killed in action, caught in no mans land digging a trench 24 May 1915. Lived with his parents at “Craigholm”, Ladywalk, Anstruther. ( also on Anstruther Easter memorial)

Alexander Watson, Private, Black Watch  (20) An apprentice printer, he was shot in the head by a sniper whilst in a frontline trench on 22 November 1916. Lived at home with his widowed mother Agnes at 58 James Street, Cellardyke.

Robert Watson, Private, Black Watch 1/7 Btn.  An apprentice plumber, he was with the local contingent of Territorials at Kinghorn camp when he “contracted a chill whilst on manoeuvres” and died in the family home 17 James Street, Cellardyke on 19 April 1915. Buried Kilrenny Parish Churchyard.
 
Charles Elder, Corporal, Royal Scots.  As late as January 1919  his parents placed an advert in the local press appealing to returning POWs for information on their son who was reported missing 12 April 1918 (and presumed dead on that date.) East Pitcorthie, Anstruther.

William Moncrieff, Private, Royal Scots (35) Lived with his wife Annie at 7 Gordon Street Leith. He survived the appalling train crash at Gretna in which many of his Edinburgh Royal Scots had been killed. Killed in Gallipoli 28 May 1915.  Parents home Shore Street, Cellardyke.

Thomas Smith, 2nd Lieutenant, Royal Scots (21) A student at St Andrews University, he was wounded in the chest by shrapnel in 1916 only a month after leaving for the front. Brought back to hospital in Aberdeen to recover and returned to frontline in April 1918. Was posted missing and possibly taken prisoner after leading a raid on German trenches 16 May 1918 - but later presumed killed on that date. 6 Rodger Street Cellardyke.

John Smith, Private, Royal Scots. Killed by a sniper’s bullet as he was withdrawing from the frontline on 28 December 1916. Previously employed in the cleekmaking factory. 10 Rodger Street, Cellardyke.

Andrew Halcrow, Private, Gordon Highlanders (27) Previously a cooper with Wolkholf and Co. in Aberdeen. Killed at Arras,  9 April 1917. Home was at 22 John Street, Cellardyke where he lived with his wife Isabella.

Wallace Low, Private, Gordon Highlanders (19) Was an apprentice bootmaker with his father in the shop in James Street but joined the Cameronians when he reached military age. Killed on the Aisne, 25 July 1918. East Forth Street.

George Moncrieff, Private, Gordon Highlanders ( 20) had been a baker in George Birrell’s shop in George Street. On 3 August 1918 he was in an advanced position in front of the British trenches when a shell splinter killed him. ( Brother of John - also on memorial) 16 George Street, Cellardyke.

John Herd, Private, Canadian Infantry 3rd Btn. (Central Ontario Regiment) (19). A machinist, he was born in Anstruther although his family appear to have emigrated as his mother was living at 148 Christie Street Toronto when he was killed on 8 September 1917.

Alex Moncrieff, Private serving with the Canadian Infantry (Alberta Regiment) 31st Btn (33) a cooper to trade, he was killed 5 May 1916. ( Brother of William - also on memorial.)

George Wilson, Sergeant, Canadian Infantry 31st Btn.(Alberta Regt.) (26)  had served his apprenticeship as plumber/ tinsmith with Gray and Pringle’s before emigrating to Canada in 1913. News of his death only received by his parents when a letter was returned to them marked “ Killed in action. Location unknown.”   (Brother of David Wilson RNRT also on memorial ) 28 Shore Street Cellardyke. 

Andrew Carnegie Black, Sapper, Royal Engineers (23) had been a miner in the west Fife coalfields. he was caught by an enemy mine explosion 20 February 1916. Lived with Margaret, his wife of only 4 months, at 62 James Street, Cellardyke.

David Allan Clement, Sergeant, Royal Engineers Reserve Coy, (20) Joined up with the Fife & Forfar  Yeomanry but transferred to the Royal Engineers to get to the front more quickly. Was gassed and sent home to recuperate, but suddenly died at his parents farm at East Pitkerie, Anstruther, on 19 March 1917. Buried in Kilrenny Parish Churchyard.

George Black, Captain, ROF (55) A local baker and Councillor, he had at one time been the commanding officer of the Anstruther Black Watch Territorials was sent to become the commandant of a military hospital in Brighton. Died of illness, 29 June 1918.

James Cairns, Lieutenant, RASC (28) Had emigrated to become a farmer in Australia returning to join up in 1915. Attached to the London Regiment, posted missing believed killed 23 April 1918. ( Brother of WL Cairns - also on memorial). Son of the laird, James Lindsay Cairns of Mount Stuart, Elie.

W.L.Cairns, Gunner, Canadian Royal Artillery (25) like his brother James had emigrated but in this case to become a farmer in Saskatchewan. Killed 6 September 1917.

P.H.Keay, Canadian Engineers (21). Killed by a bullet wound through the lungs while in charge of a working party, about 8.45pm on Thursday night March 16 1916. Was apprenticed as a plumber before going to Canada with his brother. 3 brothers in the Forces. Parents home- Burnside Place, Cellardyke. (also on Anstruther Easter memorial)

John Moncrieff, Lance Corporal, Seaforth Highlanders (28) Had served his apprenticeship with the Cellardyke firm of Melville and Co. and then moved to South Shields for work. Killed on the first day of the Somme 1 July 1916. (Brother George - also on the memorial)16 George Street, Cellardyke.

James Murray, Corporal, Canadian Highlanders 15th Btn.(Central Ontario Regt.) (21) Born in Cellardyke. Employed as a clerk in Canada. Killed at Ypres on 22 April 1915. 4 Rodger Street, Cellardyke.

Philip Oliphant Ray, 2nd Lieutenant, Royal Flying Corps (23) Son of the former minister of Cellardyke Parish Church, joined the Cameronians from Glasgow University where he was studying engineering. Commissioned as 2nd Lieutenant in the 8 Btn Black Watch. Joined RFC 59th Squadron and was shot down at Arras on 13 April 1917 by Baron von Richthofen’s squadron. The Manse,Toll Road, Cellardyke.

David Robertson, Private, Scots Guards, - no information.

Andrew Robertson, Private, Labour Corps - no information

Robert Paterson Smith, Lieutenant, Machine Gun Company, Seaforth Highlanders 8 Btn. (29) Came to Cellardyke as assistant headmaster in February 1914 and was interim headmaster till March 1915. He was attached at first to the Royal Scots. Killed 2 August 1918.A native of Newtongrange.

John Thomson, Lance Corporal, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders 7 Btn. (20) Had been employed in Clydesdale Bank Anstruther. In April 1918  admitted to hospital, wounded in thigh by shell splinter. Septic poisoning forced amputation. He recovered from the operation sufficiently to write to his parents but died 9 June 1918. 22 James Street, Cellardyke

William Anderson, Corporal, Black Watch.  No local information. There were only two Corporals called William Anderson recorded as having been killed in World War 1 . One was a 19 year old from Montrose. The other was born in Cowdenbeath, Fife, who served with the 1st/6th Btn, was killed on 7 October 1918.